Team

 

About iPExWe have brought together a team of researchers and NHS personnel with unrivalled expertise in innovation and research in patients’ experiences, internet use, development of health outcome measures, primary care trials of complex interventions and dissemination of health information.

 

 

 

 


Principal investigator

Sue Ziebland

Sue Ziebland

Sue Ziebland is Professor of Medical Sociology and director of the Health Experiences Research Group, based in the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences. She is also a research fellow at Green Templeton College. In 2013 she was appointed as an NIHR Senior Investigator. Sue’s background is in medical sociology, with increasing focus on qualitative research approaches. Since completing her MSc in Social Research Methods Sue has worked as a researcher in the academic, NHS and voluntary sectors and has published over 130 papers and chapters in social science and health publications. Sue’s other research interests include people’s use of the internet for health information and qualitative research methods (which she teaches at various levels). Sue edited (with Angela Coulter, Louise Locock and Joseph Calabrese) ‘Understanding and using health Experiences: improving patient care’ which was published by Oxford University Press in 2013.


Co-investigators

Bob Gann

Robert Gann

Programme Director, Widening Digital Participation, Patients & Information, NHS England

Until recently, Bob was Head of Strategy and Engagement for NHS Choices at the Department of Health. He joined the Department from NHS Direct where he was Director of New Media, responsible for the NHS Direct website and digital tv services. In his career Bob has worked in health care libraries, in NHS public affairs, and as chief executive of a not-for-profit agency providing health information services (Help for Health). Bob has served on a number of working parties and task forces, and was one of the 25 NHS leaders who signed the NHS Plan. He is a Fellow of CILIP and Visiting Professor in health informatics at Plymouth University. He is now directing a programme for NHS England which aims to widen digital participation in health care.

 

 

Sula Wiltshire

Sula Wiltshire

Director of Quality & Innovation and OCCG Lead Nurse

 
John Powell

John Powell

Associate professor, University of Oxford Department of Primary Care Health Sciences. Also,

  • Consultant Clinical Adviser, NICE
  • Research Associate, Oxford Internet Institute
  • Honorary Professor, University of Manchester

I am an academic public health physician and health services researcher. I study e-health and connected health: investigating how information and communication technology can be used to improve health and health services. I also have an interest in knowledge management and systems improvement in the NHS. I work part-time for NICE and part-time in Oxford. Since 2005 I have been a member of the NIHR Health Technology Assessment Editorial Board.

My work sits on the interface between research, policy and practice. My projects are usually interdisciplinary and collaborative, and are in three main areas: (1) Evaluating the effectiveness of e-health tools – for example: a randomised trial of an internet-based intervention on the NHS website to promote mental wellbeing in the general population; a randomised trial of an internet intervention for cardiac rehabilitation; the development of a serious game intervention for childhood obesity and the development and piloting of a virtual reality tool for the treatment of social phobia. (2) Investigating how a connected health world is changing how patients and the public interact with services and manage their own health – for example: a study examining the sharing of online patient experiences; and a study examining how young people are engaging with health care in new ways. (3) Investigating how the health service makes decisions – for example a study of how NHS commissioning decisions are made; and an ethnographic study of how NHS Chief Executives make decisions – both with Warwick Business School.

 
Sally Wyke

Sally Wyke

Interdisciplinary Chair of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow

Sally’s first degree was in Human Sciences, at University College London and her PhD in Health Care Research at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne.  She has worked as a health services researcher and lecturer at the University of Wales, the MRC Medical Sociology Unit, Queen Margaret University College, the University of Edinburgh and the University of Stirling.  She was Director of the Scottish School of Primary Care between 2000 and 2004 and Director of the Alliance for Self Care Research between 2005 and 2011.  She received an honorary Fellowship from the Royal College of General Practitioners in 2004.

In April 2011 Sally took up the newly created post of Interdisciplinary Chair of Health and Wellbeing at the University of Glasgow.  Sally continues to apply social scientific understanding and methods to health and healthcare problems with a focus on complex interventions to help people manage their health and health risks better, including the use of information based on personal experiences.

 

 

Pamela Briggs

Pamela Briggs

Professor of Applied Psychology, Northumbria University

Pam holds a Chair in Applied Psychology, delivering innovative research and consultancy around issues of identity, trust and security in new social media.  Her research seeks answers to three main questions: Why and when do we feel secure in disclosing sensitive identity information about ourselves? What makes us trust an electronic message? How and when do we seek to protect our privacy?

In the last five years, Pam has published over forty articles on human perceptions of trust, privacy and security in computer-mediated communication and has recently developed, with colleagues, an innovative model of health advice-seeking online (ESRC funded). She has given a number of invited addresses on online trust and e-health, including an invited address on e-health to the World Health Summit 2009, the opening address at the Second International Conference on Privacy, Security and Trust (Canada) and the keynote to the 2010 IFIP Trust Management conference in Morioka, Japan. She has been a member of ESRC’s fellowship and CASE studentship committees and has recently made a contribution to the Govt. Office for Science’s Technology Foresight programme on the Future of Identity. She is currently a member of EPSRC’s new Identity Futures Network and also EPSRC’s Cybersecurity Network.  She is one of the founder members of the UK’s new ‘Science of Cybersecurity’ Institute, funded by GCHQ in association with RCUK’s Global Uncertainty Programme.

 
Peter Harris

Peter Harris

Professor of Psychology, University of Sussex

Peter Harris is a social and health psychologist. His research interests include the examination of how people respond to information about their health. He has a particular interest in how people respond to health-risk information, especially information that they may find unwelcome or uncongenial. He also has an interest in how people respond to the threats posed by infectious diseases, such as seasonal and pandemic influenza, and how they cope with chronic illness, particularly epilepsy.

He has published in leading journals in general, social and health psychology and been involved in research grants totalling more than £3 million.

He studied at University College London and has worked at the Universities of Nottingham, Sussex, Hertfordshire and Sheffield, before returning to Sussex in 2012.

 
Margaret Booth

Margaret Booth

Margaret Booth’s role is to ensure user consultation on all key issues and to chair the user panels. She currently works as a session supervisor at Oxford Citizens Advice Bureau and until recently was a lay member of the General Medical Council’s Fitness to Practise Panels. She has previously been a member of the Oxford City Patients’ Forum and the Oxfordshire Community Health Council and a non-executive director of the Oxfordshire Community Health Trust. Earlier she worked as a statistician in the Department of Health concentrating on public health and, in particular, the development of the Health Survey for England.

 
Louise Locock

Louise Locock

Director of Applied Research, Health Experiences Research Group, University of Oxford and Health Experiences Fellow, Oxford Biomedical Research Centre

Louise Locock is the Deputy Research Director of the Health Experiences Research Group, and a University Research Lecturer in the Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford.

Louise’s research interests include qualitative research into personal experiences of health and illness, especially in the field of pregnancy and antenatal screening, motor neurone disease, evidence-based medicine and clinical trials. Since April 2009 she has taken up a joint fellowship in Health Experiences with the Oxford Biomedical Research Centre.

 

 

Rafael Perera

Rafael Perera

Professor of Medical Statistics
My main activity is as Director of the Statistics group in the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences (NDPCHS) which I joined in 2002. I am involved in a number of research activities within the department; however my main focus is the study of Monitoring for the management of long-term conditions (e.g. Type 2 diabetes, hypertension, etc).
I have overseen the development of one of the strongest methodological/statistical groups in the UK (across all clinical areas) with a particular emphasis on Monitoring, with my group achieving national and international recognition [NIHR Progress Report 2008/09-Delivering Health Research]. As part of this, I am the Statistical director of our fully accredited Clinical Trials Unit (only 55 units have received full accreditation in the UK).
I sit on a range of national and international panels and boards that influence healthcare policy at different levels (funding boards, steering groups, data monitoring boards, etc.). I am also a Statistical Editor of the BMJ (since 2011) and was a member of the NIHR Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Commissioning board until 2012, joining in 2007 as Associate Member becoming a full Board Member in 2009.
I am also Director of Research Methodologies in the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine (CEBM) as well a fellow at St Hugh’s college Oxford.

 

 

Crispin Jenkinson

Crispin Jenkinson

Professor of Health Services Research, University of Oxford

Crispin Jenkinson is Professor of Health Services Research in the Department of Public Health at Oxford University, and a Senior Research Fellow of Harris Manchester College. He graduated from Bedford College (University of London) before coming to Oxford where he gained an MSc in Psychology and then undertook research on the psychological impact of long-term illness for a DPhil. Prior to joining the Department of Public Health in 1992, he was a research fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford.

His main research interests include quality of life and health status measurement, the evaluation of patient experiences of medical care, and methodology. He has extensive experience of developing and validating outcome measures and, in collaboration with others, has conducted randomised controlled trials in which such instruments have been primary end-points.  He has written and edited a number of books as well as having published over 140 peer reviewed papers.

 

 

Andrew Farmer

Andrew Farmer

Professor of General Practice, University of Oxford

I undertook my DM thesis in the University Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology at Oxford whilst still working as a principal in general practice at Thame Health Centre, where I had previously completed my vocational training programme. Between 2001 and 2006 I was a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Primary Health Care holding an NHS R&D Senior Clinical Scientist Award. I took up my current post in 2007, with a role as the founding Director of the Oxford Primary Care Clinical Trials Unit. I also work as an associate general practitioner at South Oxford Health Centre and am a Research Associate of the Diabetes Trials Unit.

My work has focused on research to improve the self-management of diabetes in general practice including the best use of blood glucose monitoring, supporting adherence to medication, and evaluating the use of digital health initiatives using mobile devices to improve long-term outcomes. I was a Harkness Fellow of the Commonwealth Fund of New York in 1991, one of the first general practitioners to hold this award.

I was appointed an NIHR Senior Investigator in 2013 and am currently Chair of one of the NIHR Programme Grants for Applied Research Programme sub-panel. I was Deputy Chair of the NIHR Health Technology Assessment Programme Commissioning Board from 2007 to 2011.

 

 

Elizabeth Sillence

Elizabeth Sillence

Senior lecturer in Psychology, Northumbria University

Liz is a Senior Lecturer within the Department of Psychology, teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. She is a member of the PaCT (Psychology and Communication Technologies) Lab – part of the Centre for Cognition and Communication.

Her research interests are focussed on trust and online interactions particularly within an e-health context. Liz is currently exploring trust exchanges within online health communities and examining the influence of online patient experience on behaviour and decision making.

Liz has also written on ethical issues in mobile human-computer-interaction and has a keen interest in qualitative methodologies.  She has attracted (as co-investigator) large research council grants both in the UK and jointly with colleagues in the USA. She has published over 20 articles on trust, privacy and online communication and regularly presents her work at national and international conferences. She has been a guest editor for the Journal of Interacting with Computers and the International Journal of Human Computer Studies.


Programme coordinators

Ruth Sanders

Ruth Sanders

Research Delivery Manager, Health Experiences Research Group, University of Oxford

Ruth Sanders joined the Health Experiences Research Group in February 2002 and was Website Manager for 5 years. Her current role – Research Delivery Project Manager – includes the scheduling, training and project management of the data and multi-media resources created within the Health Experiences Research Group.

 

 

Angela Martin

Angela Martin

Programme co-ordinator, University of Oxford

Angela is the iPEx programme coordinator and Health Experiences Research group Operations Manager. She has worked previously in the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford as the research co-ordinator for a clinical study of patients with severe developmental eye anomalies.

Angela’s career in research management followed a post-doctoral career in microbial molecular biology in the Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford. She also spent some time in the Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, USA. She obtained her PhD from the University of Birmingham in 1997 for her work on the stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori.


Researchers

Fadhila Mazanderani

Fadhila Mazanderani

Chancellors’ Fellow, University of Edinburgh (was University of Warwick)

Fadhila Mazanderani has recently been awarded a Chancellor’s Fellowship at the University of Edinburgh. She has an undergraduate degree in computer science and information systems from the University of Pretoria in South Africa, a masters degree from the LSE and a DPhil from the Oxford Internet Institute where her thesis focused on health-related internet use in the context of contemporary HIV treatment and care. Her primary research interests are in the intersection between information technology, health and care practices, drawing on insights from science and technology studies, medical sociology and feminism.

 

 
Claire Hardy

Claire Hardy

Postdoctoral Researcher, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London
Claire has until recently been a Postdoctoral Researcher within the Psychology and Communication Technology (PacT) research group in the Department of Psychology at Northumbria University. She worked with Professor Pam Briggs and Dr Liz Sillence on e-health and the role of online personal experiences (PEx). The project involved using mixed methods and eye-tracking technology to assess the impact of PEx across several health groups. In November 2013 she accepted a new position at the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College London.
Claire successfully gained her Psychology BSc (Hons) from the University of York in 2004. Claire then went on to study for her MSc in Occupational Psychology from the Institute of Work, Health and Organisations at the University of Nottingham, which she gained in 2005. Remaining in the same research institute, Claire then studied part-time for a PhD in Applied Psychology, using mixed methods to examine British expatriation and develop a new personality measure for assessment and selection of British employees to work abroad. She successfully gained her doctorate in 2011.

Previous to her current role, Claire has worked on a number of research projects in several UK universities within the areas of selection and assessment (namely, personality and cognitive ability testing), health and well-being at work, and new technologies for online distance learning. She has also carried out consultancy work in public and private sector organisations in Europe and Asia.  She has taught at undergraduate and postgraduate levels within universities in the UK and abroad, including working as Teaching Fellow for distance learning Masters courses at the University of Leicester. Claire is member of the British Psychological Society (BPS) and a reviewer for the BPS annual Division of Occupational Psychology (DOP) Conference.

 
Laura Griffith

Laura Griffith

Lecturer in the Anthropology of Health Care, University of Birmingham

Until recently Laura Griffith was a Senior Qualitative Researcher in the Health Experiences Research Group. Laura’s research interests included qualitative research into personal experiences of health and illness, especially in the field of mental health and the provision of health services to address social inequalities. Laura did her DPhil concerning the emotional experiences of Bangladeshi mothers in the East End of London. She then coordinated a study for the National Institute for Mental Health in England on the experiences of acute psychiatric care amongst BME communities in Birmingham, based at Warwick Medical School. Other projects have included coordinating a project based at Aston Business School investigating how multi professional teams function in the NHS. In November 2013 she accepted a lectureship at the University of Birmingham.

 

 

Susan Kirkpatrick

Susan Kirkpatrick

Senior Qualitative Researcher, University of Oxford

Susan joined the Health Experiences Research Group as a Senior Researcher in January 2010.  She has a first class degree in Sociology (1998), and gained an MA (distinction) in Family Research (2001).  Susan specialises in qualitative research and over the last ten years has worked on a variety of projects focusing on families and health.

 

 

Nicolas Hughes

Nicolas Hughes

Nursing Lecturer, University of Leeds Nic is a lecturer in nursing. His current research is a narrative study of older peoples’ experiences living with cancer. Nic’s teaching has related mostly to end of life care. He also has extensive experience in supporting practitioners in self-directed learning. Nic is Programme Leader for the MHSc. Nursing Practice.

 

 

Laura Kelly

Laura Kelly

Research Officer, University of Oxford

Laura Kelly is a Research Officer in Outcomes Measurement in the Health Services Research Unit at the University of Oxford. Laura has interests in research methodology, psychometric measure development, e-health and experiences of health. She is currently working on a number of projects including the development of a Patient-Reported Outcome Measure for a range of long-term conditions and the development of an instrument to assess self-management in people with type 2 diabetes using computer-based interventions.
Laura recently completed a DPhil in Population Health which was funded by a NIHR programme examining the role of patients’ experiences as a resource for choice and decision making in health care. Laura obtained a BA (Hons) in Politics and Social Policy from Queens University Belfast and subsequently completed a MSc in Applied Social Research in Trinity College, Dublin. Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent time as a research assistant developing an assessment tool to measure health-related quality of life for people with neurological damage to their spinal cord using intermittent self-catheterisation.

 

 

Nikki Newhouse

Nikki Newhouse

Research Assistant, University of Oxford

Nikki is working on the final work package, the randomised controlled trial. Her background is varied: a BA (Hons) in English Literature from UCL and a successful career in publishing and as a freelance writer, followed by a conversion degree in Psychology (Oxford Brookes University), where she taught and assessed both qualitative and quantitative research methods at introductory and advanced levels. Nikki also has professional and research experience of working in various public health settings, including Rethink, Mind and Maggies Cancer Caring Centres.
Nikki is a PhD student at UCL’s Interaction centre (UCLIC) and eHealth Unit, where her research focuses on the ways in which novel technologies can support antenatal health and wellbeing.

 

 

Ly-Mee Yu

Ly-Mee Yu

Lead trial statistician, University of Oxford

I’m a senior medical statistician and Lead Trial Statistician for the CTU within the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences. I am responsible for overseeing the statistical aspects of clinical trials activity within the CTU. I joined the Department in 2013 after previously working at the Centre for Statistics in Medicine where I led a team of statisticians, collaborating on a variety of clinical studies (predominately randomised controlled trials) and supported numerous funding applications (e.g. NIHR, FP7, MRC, and Wellcome Trust). I have over 20 years of experience as a medical statistician and specifically in clinical trials for the past 10 years. I have worked in a wide range of clinical areas, including but not limited to, vaccinology, cardiovascular medicine, infectious disease, surgery, allied health, mental health, neurosciences, respiratory, and orthopaedics. I have published over 100 articles in peer-reviewed journals such as the Lancet, JAMA and the BMJ. I am also a member of the data and safety monitoring and trial steering committees of several national and international trials. I am also leading the core statistical SOPs group for the Oxford clinical trials unit.
My research interests include, missing data, covariate adjustment in clinical trials, systematic review of reporting of clinical trials and prediction models. I have been involved in organising and teaching the Centre for Statistics in Medicine’s course on Randomised Controlled Trials Course in the UK and in Vietnam. I am also course tutor of the Clinical Vaccine Development and Biomanufacturing organised by the Department for Continuing Education.

 

 

 

Mina Davoudianfar

Mina Davoudianfar

Assistant clinical trials project manager

Mina is the Trial Manager for the randomised, controlled trial (EXPERT). She joined the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences in April 2013 as an Assistant Clinical Trials Project Manager. Her role is to set-up, manage and deliver clinical trials at GP practices. In addition to managing the EXPERT trial she is also involved with:

HEAT- a large randomised controlled trial designed to investigate whether a one week course of Helicobacter pylori eradication will reduce the incidence of gastric ulcer bleeding in patients using aspirin ≤325mg daily.

POWeR2- a behavioural study to estimate the effectiveness of an internet based behavioural intervention with face-to-face support and remote support among obese patients in primary care.

Prior to her current role, she was working in an Oncology Clinical Trials Office (Department of Oncology) for six years, working on different phase III randomised cancer trials.

 
Braden O'Neill

Braden O’Neill

Family Medicine Resident, North York General Hospital, University of Toronto

Braden has recently commenced residency in Family Medicine in the Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto. Prior to this, he was a DPhil student in the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences (2011-2014), supervised by Sue Ziebland and John Powell. His doctoral thesis focused on the impact of health literacy level on people’s use of the Internet to acquire and share information about health and illness.
He is interested in effective methods of communicating research to the public, and applying the practical tools of evidence-based medicine to issues of public importance. He works with the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine on various projects related to this, and is an Honorary Fellow of the Centre.
Prior to commencing medical education he worked in social care and the provision of health services to individuals experiencing homelessness. He is a Rhodes Scholar (Alberta and University College, 2011), and holds a Doctor of Medicine degree from the Cumming School of Medicine at the University of Calgary, Canada.

 

 

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Sena Jawad

Medical Statistician, CTU, University of Oxford. I joined the clinical trials unit in the department in 2014 as a clinical trials statistician.  I provide statistical support for a number of trials, including studies with the Oxford Vaccine Group and the AFFECT trial. I have an MSc in medical statistics from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and a BSc in statistics, economics and finance from University College London.  Prior to my appointment at the University of Oxford, I worked as a medical statistician on a TB interventional cohort study at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.